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Principle of Laser capture microscopy new protocol
Laser capture microscopy by S Curran et.al. Mol Pathol. 2000 April; 53(2): 6468. Abstract Human tissues are composed of complex admixtures of different cell types and their biologically meaningful analysis necessitates the procurement of pure samples of ...

Protocols for LCM preparation and analysis (NIH) new protocol
Original protocol from NIH laser capture microdissection core facility. Content: I. Preparation, LCM and RNA/DNA extraction of Frozen Tissue Sections A. Embedding B. Cutting C. Staining II. Preparation and LCM of Paraffin Embedded Tissue S ...

LCM troubleshooting for Histogene LCM staining kit protocol
HistoGene LCM frozen tissue staining kit mannual and troubleshooting guide. Troubleshoots following problems: A. Targeted cells do not lift from the slide during LCM B. RNA cannot be recovered from the sample ...

Laser Capture Microdissection Using Frozen Tissue Sections new protocol
Protocols and reagents are from Acturus. The final products can be used for RT-PCR or Microarray analysis. (Morris White Lab, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Division of Endocrinology, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School) ...

Introduction to Laser-capture microdissection LCM new review
Introduction to Laser-capture microdissection (LCM) technology by Ed Brignole. The LCM system developed at NIH and Arcturus is basically an inverted microscope fitted with a low-power near-infrared laser. Content: 1. Isolating individual cells f ...

NIH Laser Capture Microdissection web new recommended site
Official web site of NIH Laser capture microdissection. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a new technology originated by NIH through an intensive collaboration between bioengineering and cancer pathology groups in NICHD, DCRT, BEIP (NCRR; now ORS) and ...

More laser capture microdissection protocols

Automated laser capture microdissection for tissue proteomics.
(Methods Mol Biol. 2008;441:71-90.)
Rodriguez AS, Espina BH, Espina V, Liotta LA.
Center for Cancer Research, Laboratory of Pathology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) is a technique for isolating pure cell populations from a heterogeneous tissue section or cytological preparation through direct visualization of the cells. This technique is applicable to molecular profiling of diseased and disease-free tissue, permitting correlation of cellular molecular signatures with specific cell populations. DNA, RNA, or protein analysis may be performed with the microdissected tissue by any method with adequate sensitivity.Automated LCM platforms combine graphical user interfaces and annotation software for visualization of the tissue of interest in addition to robotically controlled microdissection. The principal components of LCM technology are (1) visualization of the cells of interest through microscopy, (2) transfer of laser energy to a thermolabile polymer with formation of a polymer-cell composite, and (3) removal of the cells of interest from the heterogeneous tissue section. Automated LCM is compatible with a variety of tissue types, cellular staining methods, and tissue preservation protocols allowing microdissection of fresh or archival specimens in a high-throughput manner. This protocol describes microdissection techniques compatible with downstream proteomic analyses.

Laser capture microdissection.
(Methods Mol Biol. 2006;319:213-29.)
Espina V, Milia J, Wu G, Cowherd S, Liotta LA.
Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine, George Mason University, Manassas, VA, USA.

Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a technique for isolating pure cell populations from a heterogeneous tissue section or cytological preparation via direct visualization of the cells. This technique is applicable to molecular profiling of diseased and disease-free tissue, permitting correlation of cellular molecular signatures with specific cell populations. DNA, RNA, or protein analysis can be performed with the microdissected tissue by any method with adequate sensitivity. The principle components of LCM technology are (1) visualization of the cells of interest via microscopy, (2) transfer of laser energy to a thermolabile polymer with formation of a polymer-cell composite, and (3) removal of the cells of interest from the heterogeneous tissue section. LCM is compatible with a variety of tissue types, cellular staining methods, and tissue-preservation protocols that allow microdissection of fresh or archival specimens. LCM platforms are available as a manual system (PixCell; Arcturus Bioscience) or as an automated system (AutoPix).

Laser capture microdissection.
(Curr Protoc Mol Biol. 2001 Aug;Chapter 25:Unit 25A.1.)
Frost AR, Eltoum IE, Siegal GP.
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.

Laser capture microdissection (LCM) offers a rapid and precise method of isolating and removing specified cells from complex tissues for subsequent analysis of their RNA, DNA, or protein content, thereby allowing assessment of the role of the cell type in the normal physiologic or disease process being studied. In this unit, protocols for the preparation of mammalian frozen tissues, fixed tissues, and cytologic specimens for LCM, including hematoxylin and eosin staining, are presented, as well as a protocol for the performance of LCM utilizing the PixCell I or II Laser Capture Microdissection System manufactured by Arcturus Engineering. Also provided is a protocol for tissue processing and paraffin embedding, and recipes for lysis buffers for the recovery of nucleic acids and proteins. The Commentary section addresses the types of specimens that can be utilized for LCM and approaches to staining of specimens for cell visualization. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of tissue or cytologic specimens as this is critical to effective LCM.


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